For the love of a good camera – in pictures

From Lily Cole posing with a supersized Pentax to Bill Brandt hiding behind his Kodak wide-angle, cameras are the stars of this collection of snaps and selfies. 

Featured image at the top:

Many photographers are posing on their selfies with a camera, this is only natural. I guess. As you can see also the top photographers have thought of the same idea for their work. I wish I could visit the exhibition to see some of my favorites. 🌞 Pelle

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Finding patterns in Australian farmland

I´d like to go to Australia! Ladies and gentlemen I give you Josh Smith. 😊  Pelle

“The end game for me is producing these series as fine art”.

© all photographs Josh Smith. Article in BBC.

Flying high above farmland, photographer Josh Smith captures colours and patterns not usually associated with rural Australia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-38888453

_94006992_14305b65-2eab-412f-be37-17c11c9ddf16His often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006993_a1405267-ed49-4374-8fce-0f513f3eb09aHis often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006997_bd80a3ef-04b3-4ae9-89dd-c6b2ec69713b It was a hobby until 2011, when his aerial shots of floods in Queensland and New South Wales were featured in a major newspaper.

_94007052_fertappSo he took to the skies, hoping to draw attention to how food and clothing is produced.

_94007055_202a3807-1a9f-4245-923b-4738de7a0996“Here in Australia, we’ve got farmers producing the highest quality produce anywhere in the world,” he said.

Please like if you like, 😉 Pelle

Turning ordinary into magical

Ever so often I feel happy after I have seen a movie from India, France, Italy or from any other country when I don´t recognize the surroundings and/or the actors. Just as great is it seeing interesting photographs from India. More street photography from where the streets looks different. I found it in The Washington Post.

😊   Pelle

Amateur photographer presents new look at life in India

More often than not, photography coming out of India tends to focus on the “exotic.” We’ve seen the pictures many times before — people performing religious rites in the Ganges River or huge gatherings like the Kumb Mela. So it is refreshing to see work that diverges from this path. Swarat Ghosh’s photographs of street scenes in India do just that. Far from the spectacles we are used to seeing, Ghosh roams the streets transforming the ordinary and banal into the magical. With his photography, he takes us on a journey through found mini-dramas or tableaus that we might ordinarily miss if we’re not watching carefully enough.

Ghosh is not a professional photographer but an avid amateur and student of the medium. In his day job, Ghosh is a lead visual designer at a software company in Hyderabad. His earliest memory of photography was when he began following the work of several street photographers (including Kaushal Parekh and Prashant Godbole) based in India around 2012. His own journey into photography actually came about accidentally at that time when his wife gave him a camera that same year.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/02/08/turning-ordinary-into-magical-amateur-photographer-presents-new-look-at-life-in-india/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.d651cd86490b

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Trash, or Not Trash!

It sometimes happens that you see photographs that you wished you had done yourself. For me, like these. The gloves I have made, but not the other. I like this. It is colorful, playful and provokes a thought about our consumption society.

Stuart Haygarth walked from Kent to Land’s End, picking up the trash he found on beaches – and arranged it into collections that show us how weird the ordinary objects in our lives can be.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/apr/11/stuart-haygarth-strand-book-beach-trash-flotsam-england

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The Washington Post: Born in the front car of the Cyclone roller coaster, a photographer who truly adored Coney Island

Street photography from a time when the streets looked different. As for most photography, time adds a special feeling, nerve and history.     😊 Pelle

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Harold Feinstein, 15-year-old high school dropout and Coney Island native, was seen as a child prodigy in photography during his time. In 1950, at age 19, his work had already been purchased for the permanent collection in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Feinstein said of his home, “I was born in Coney Island hospital in 1931, and I used to say that I dropped from my mother’s womb straight into the front car of the Cyclone roller coaster!”

His photographs span six decades of Coney Island and the streets of New York, work that was praised by renowned photographer and close friend of Feinstein’s, W. Eugene Smith.

“Harold Feinstein is one of the very few photographers I have known or have been influenced by with the ability to reveal the familiar to me as beautifully new, in a strong and honest way,” Smith said of Feinstein.

A retrospective of Feinstein’s work, “The Early Years (1940’s-1950’s): Contagious Optimism” will be on display from Feb. 3 to April 30 at the Galerie Thierry Bigaignon in Paris.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/02/03/born-in-front-car-of-the-cyclone-roller-coaster-a-photographer-who-truly-loved-coney-island/

The last box camera in Santiago, Chile – in pictures

Everything is not digital these days. Another place, but the same time. 😊 Pelle

Luis Maldonado is the last remaining photographer in the main square of the Chilean capital still using a wooden box camera.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2017/jan/30/the-last-box-camera-in-santiago-chile-in-pictures?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Back to the future

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38815948

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The inventors of digital cameras have won the highest international engineering prize.

This year’s £1m Queen Elizabeth Prize recognises the development of the technologies that turn light into digital signals.

The Royal Academy of Engineering judging panel said the inventors’ work had “revolutionised” the world.

It sure did…😊                  This story was told by BBC.

My first digital camera was a 4×5″ scanner, a Dicomed, with a file size of 129 mb.

A study of industry data by Prof Fossum suggests that 100 digital cameras are made every second and a billion photos are uploaded each day.

Asked if he was proud that his development gave rise to a technology that is so ubiquitous, Dr Tompsett told BBC News he had some mixed feelings. Yes, he felt some pride, but he “also felt the opposite”.

“I feel frustrated by all these people who have cameras, taking pictures of everything in sight – and selfies. You are walking along and a selfie stick suddenly appears.”

And he added wryly: “I sometimes think whoever invented this technology should be dealt with.”

Photography, inspiration, reflections, personal