Category Archives: Memories

My first view of China

On my first trip to China recently I took some personal photographs. Very much street photography. China is a very interesting graphic country. What the signs say I don´t know, but I like the looks of them. The images below are mostly from the streets and I can imagine keep right and left…

😊  Pelle

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The Met Celebrates Irving Penn, Revolutionary Photographer

They do, and once again I wish I had all the time in the world just going around enjoying exhibitions. Together with Avedon and Albert Watson he is one of my absolute favorite photographers. Over the years I have got so much inspiration from his work. The frozen fruits, cigarette butts, flowers, the backdrops and SO MUCH more. Recently we have been fortunate here in Stockholm to see his work at Åmells. What more could a photographer my age ask for? 😊  Pelle

Top image: A photo shoot for “Mouth (for L’Oréal), New York, 1986.” Credit Irving Penn Foundation, Metropolitan Museum of Art

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An animated portrait of the movie star Marlene Dietrich, shot in 1948. Credit Irving Penn Foundation, Metropolitan Museum of Art

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“Rochas Mermaid Dress (Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn), Paris, 1950.” Penn married the model that year. Credit Irving Penn, Condé Nast and Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Penn’s use of sharp, angled corners in his sets fit the narrow frame of his subject in the portrait “Marcel Duchamp, New York, 1948.” Credit Irving Penn Foundation, Metropolitan Museum of Art

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“Irving Penn: Centennial,” spanning decades of the photographer’s work, opens on Monday at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Credit Irving Penn Foundation, Metropolitan Museum of Art; Alex Wroblewski for The New York Time

 

The photojournalism of Eddie Adams – in pictures

Once a photographer, always a photographer. You don´t have a career for 50 years if you´re not a photographer by heart. A great title for the book. 😊  Pelle

He was best known for his Pulitzer prize-winning photo, Saigon Execution, but Eddie Adams won over 500 awards for his work, throughout a 50-year career. Starting as a photographer in the marines, he covered war zones, refugees, riots and celebrities. Eddie Adams: Bigger Than The Frame is published by the University of Texas Press.

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/apr/10/eddie-adam-photojournalism-saigon-execution-pictures#img-7

From The Guardian.

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Servicemen lift President John F Kennedy’s casket off a caisson in front of the Capitol, 24 November 1963.

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Marine Corps recruit depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, 1970.

Magnum photographers’ historic shots of New York – in pictures

Magnum has always been, and is always great photography by great photographers.     Oh, there are SO MANY exhibitions I would like to see…

I found this in The Guardian.

😊  Pelle

As part of its 70th anniversary program, Magnum Photos is holding an exhibition of photographs taken in New York City during the early years of the agency, from 1947 to 1960. The show includes classic images from their archive, as well as pictures from their New York office. Early Magnum In & On New York is at the National Arts Club Grand Gallery until 29 April, can be viewed online and prints purchased through Magnum.

Image at the top:
Photographers Elliott Erwitt and Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1959
Photograph: Marc Riboud/Magnum Photos

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/mar/31/magnum-photos-new-york-city-historic-pictures?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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New York, 1955
Photograph: Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos

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Sammy Davis Jr looks out a Manhattan window, 1959
Photograph: Burt Glinn/Magnum

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James Dean in Times Square, 1955
Photograph: Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

Still Going Strong

Great to see these images from a young Bod Dylan! I was happy to attend his first concert here in Stockholm last Saturday after that he received The Nobel price. A great concert by a great artist. He has changd his hat. 😊  Pelle

As Bob Dylan accepts his Nobel prize for literature this weekend, an exhibition of photographs of him on the cusp of international fame is planned to open in New York. The photographer Ted Russell first met Dylan in 1961 and his intimate pictures of Dylan performing, and at home, are the subject of a show at the Steven Kasher Gallery featuring dozens of images never before seen in the city. Bob Dylan NYC 1961–1964 opens on 20 April and will run until 3 June.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2017/apr/01/portraits-of-a-young-bob-dylan-in-pictures

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These forgotten shreds of plastic helped a photographer mourn his mom

Simple, beautiful and emotional. There are still great ideas and photographs out there just waiting to be made. 😊  Pelle

© Wes Bell, and the article was found in The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/13/these-forgotten-shreds-of-plastic-helped-a-photographer-mourn-his-mom/

Wes Bell’s series “Snag,” inspired by the death of his mother, takes a beautiful and simple idea and infuses an ordinary scene with great emotional power. There is beauty, loss and poetry in every frame. After 20 years in New York working as an international fashion photographer, Bell returned to his birthplace and to fine-art photography in Alberta, Canada.

In describing this work, Bell said: “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags, caught in barbed-wire fences that lined the ditches. Whipped violently by the wind, they were left shredded and lacerated, but trapped nonetheless in the no man’s land of boundary fences, neither here nor there. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance — Snag.”

Loss and remembrance are universal, and Bell makes feeling those emotions accessible and visible.

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