Category Archives: Media

The Observer W Eugene Smith, the photographer who wanted to record everything

Together with Avedon, Penn, Steichen, Strand, Arbus, Cartier-Bresson, Albert Watson and a few more, he is one of the truly great photographers. For me. They are all different and perhaps I should not compare them. So I don´t. Read the article from The Guardian, by Sean O `Hagan.

See the images and imagine the sound that he recorded.     😊   Pelle

Smith took many famous pictures, but also taped hours of audio of jazz greats, writers and artists of the day in his New York loft. A new book explores his strange world

Smith was perhaps the single most important American photographer in the development of the editorial photo essay. His visual narratives, usually published in Life magazine, were often brutally atmospheric. He evoked the horrors of the second world war in the Pacific, where he was injured by mortar fire, and chronicled the working life of Dr Ernest Ceriani in the small town of Kremmling, Colorado, in his 1948 series, Country Doctor, now recognised as the first extended editorial photo story.

In 1955, Smith became a member of the Magnum picture agency, travelling to Pittsburgh for his first assignment, which entailed producing 100 photographs in three weeks to mark the city’s first centenary. He worked on the project for three years, producing around 21,000 photographs. Today, his legacy is maintained by the W Eugene Smith Memorial Fund, which celebrates and encourages the kind of humanistic photography he pioneered, if not the impossible tasks he set himself and his beleaguered editors.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/aug/06/w-eugene-smith-photographer-record-everything

Gene Smith’s Sink by Sam Stephenson is published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux on 22 August ($26)

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A US soldier during the final days of fighting to gain control of the island of Saipan from occupying Japanese forces during the second world war. Photograph: W Eugene Smith/Life/Getty
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Smoke pours from the chimneys of an Ohio steel mill in a 1949 picture for Life magazine. Photograph: W Eugene Smith/Life/Getty
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Country doctor Ernest Ceriani photographed after having performed a caesarean section during which both baby and mother died due to complications. The picture, taken in Kremmling, Colorado, was part of Smith’s groundbreaking photo essay for Life magazine in 1948. Photograph: W Eugene Smith/Life/Getty

Fake or not fake. Do you see the difference? Take the test!

These days fake is a common word. Many people present alternative facts and want us to beleive in their truth. This is a very interesting test I noticed in the Washington Post. Read the article and do the test. I have. The research was done in England.

So amid this fakery and our obsession these days with “fake news,” just how good are we at separating fact from fiction when it comes to photos?

Not good at all, says Sophie J. Nightingale, who researches cognitive psychology at the University of Warwick in England.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/07/17/many-people-cant-tell-when-photos-are-fake-can-you/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_fakephotos-825pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.3680317a245d

However, a personal thought. If something is added on a picture, or removed, is very difficult to see and understand. The image of the person at the top of the article is easy. Don´t you agree?

Anyway, we need to be aware and look out for this.  By the way, I had 4. But it could easily have been zero.

Pelle   😉