Category Archives: The past

What is art?

A good and eternal question. A very talented artist, Ernst Billgren, has written two books about it. A great, funny and interesting read. In one of the articles he writes “that many things can maybe be considered art, but perhaps not a wrench”. Note! He does NOT say that it isn´t art, and that is about the wrench itself. How, if you use a wrench in your art? Then perhaps the wrench becomes art. Or part of.

I realise that over the years I have photographed many wrenches in many different ways. Art or not, that was nothing that I have ever given a thought. Here is a small selection of images, and perhaps I can produce an exhibition with just wrenches in the near future.

My father had a garage and that was where I grew up around cars, tractors, lorries and lots of tools. I did not become a mechanics like my father and brother but I have always kept en interest in and love to, especially, old tools. I have also taken care of the tools after my father in law. They often becomes items in my photographed still lifes. I am sure my background has something to do with this.

More tool and wrench art is to come.

If it becomes an exhibition I will be happy to write to Ernst Billgren about it…😉 Pelle

Now I have also started painting them. This is made with watercolors.
From a calendar project in 2000. No. Vlll = 8

More Polaroids

8×10″ Emulsion Transfer

I promised to show more Polaroids, and here is another selection.

You could also lift the emulsion from the Polaroid and transfer that to another material. Like here. It was tricky, using warm water and soft brushes. You had to be VERY careful not to destroy the emulsion because it is so very thin.

I became a digital photographer very early. It was not planned, but circumstances had it that way. I never regret that, but I sometimes miss the analog days. Like when I see these images. These are all 8×10″ made with my Sinar camera and lots of patience.

😊 Pelle

polaroids, big and small

Stille life with old postcards

Polaroid used to be a material photographers used to secure the exposure, but it also gave us an opportunity to use it more artistically.

It came in 3 1/4×4 1/4″, 4×5″ and 8×10″ size. But also in 20×24″ built for very special Polaroid cameras. I used Polaroids frequently and also made Polaroid transfers. The image was then transferred on to other papers, films etc. I held workshops at Photokina in Cologne and various other places to show how to do.

My images with the 20×24″ camera were made in Stockholm using one of the very few Polaroid cameras that were traveling the world. It never went anywhere without an assistant. To be prepared for the event I made my sketches in 8×10″ on my studio floor. However, the Polaroid camera was huge and I had to nail and glue all my still lifes on a board leaning it to a wall. I just couldn´t tilt it as much as my 8×10″ camera. When you see the camera you will understand. I think the transfers I made with this camera are rare.

That was many years ago, but I still remember it like it was yesterday. During a day I made a total of 4 images. The image above with a selection of postcards after my grandmother. Original image size 20×24″ is 52×62 cm!

I will be back to show some more Polaroid images in other formats and styles that I made.

Polaroid also produced the SX-70 camera, but that is another story.

😊 Pelle

The team from Polaroid and me in the middle.
Me and the assistant working on a transfer. I am so sorry I don´t remember his name.
Still life with old school books and film stars

Chet Baker playing at Fasching in Stockholm

I celebrate that today, on this very day 41 years ago, I photographed Chet Baker at the Fasching Jazzclub here in Stockholm. Some of those images can be seen at my exhibition at Fasching today and until April. I have added the review at the bottom, to be read in Swedish.

Fasching is at Kungsgatan 63, Stockholm

I haven´t posted anything here for a very long time. Perhaps today´s post will be a change for the better.

Until next time. 😊

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Chet Baker2

Perhaps to be included in the 2019 calendar

These images could be selected for the 2019 calender. A project I have made for about 20 years together with my dear friend Peter Schaeublin in Schaffhaussen, Switzerland. And the Stamm printers. The calendar has always been a giveaway and is not for sale.

Pelle😊

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“a man with the camera of an artist, the pen of a poet and a genius for the impossible”

Said by Harrison Salisbury about David Douglas Duncan. A life in photography. This is fantastic reading from Washington Post with many great links for more interesting material.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/david-douglas-duncan-photo-nomad-who-captured-war-and-picasso-dies-at-102/2018/06/07/8b8fb84e-6a93-11e8-9e38-24e693b38637_story.html?utm_term=.bbec8af2b344

Top image, Marine Capt. Ike Fenton during a Korean War battle in 1950.                                (© David Douglas Duncan/Harry Ransom Center)

😊  Pelle

It is not always as you think it is…

How a Galway Pub Led to a Skyscraper

A friend just sent me this article about another classic image many thought, for good reasons, was made by Hine. A great story. He found it in The New York Times.

🙂  Pelle

Rare photographs that changed lives

And photography still changes lives! 🙂  Pelle

http://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-43031764

Twenty-four photographs from the Lewis Hine archive have been auctioned in New York. The rare prints were from the collection of the late New York photographer Isador Sy Seidman.

American sociologist Hine was one of the most important documentary photographers of the 20th Century. Because the notion of photojournalism and documentary did not exist at the time, Hine called his projects “photo stories”, using images and words to fight for the causes he believed in.

The prints span Hine’s career and many are from his most well-known projects, centring on the poor and disadvantaged from the Carolinas, New York and Pittsburgh.

All photographs courtesy of Swann Auction Galleries.

The above image: Hot day on East Side, New York, 1908.

I found these photographs in BBC.

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Labourer on connector, Empire State Building, 1930-31.

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Pennsylvania coal breakers, [Breaker Boys], 1912.

I admit

That I don´t often get too impressed by photography that I see. But this is just wonderful. I think! 😀  Pelle

 From Washington Post

Timeless tintypes of the world’s most photographed subjects

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/12/19/timeless-tintypes-of-the-worlds-most-photographed-subjects/?hpid=hp_hp-visual-stories-desktop_no-name%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.854c17288b1e

At Sundance Film Festival, photographer Victoria Will had just minutes with some of Hollywood’s most famous actors and directors — arguably, some of the most photographed people in the world — but she chose a process that at its core is imperfect: tintype.

The 19th century wet-plate photography process predates film. There are no negatives, no large digital files or multiple frames, and no do-overs. Each image is one of a kind.

It starts in the darkroom, where each plate must be coated by hand with light sensitive emulsion. The exposure starts with a comically blinding amount of light, which is reflected off the subject into the camera lens and onto the aluminum plate still wet with emulsion. Any dry patches will remain undeveloped. It is an unforgiving medium. It also makes each image undeniably unique.

“I love that when you make a tintype you are making a thing, a physical photographic object — one that you can hold and experience in a different way,” Will told In Sight. “But I also love the finicky nature of the chemistry. Each plate is one of a kind. In the digital age these two aspects of the medium really inspire me.”

On one of the last pages of the book is a quote from Walker Evans: “The eye traffics in feelings, not in thoughts.” When asked, Will said it sums up what she loves and why she is so drawn to photography. “A successful image for me is one that makes you feel. It needs to touch you in some way,” she said. “I think unconsciously, and clearly articulated by Evans here, photographers are moved by emotion. That’s what is actually pushing the shutter.”

Skärmavbild 2017-12-20 kl. 11.26.39

Read this!!!

This is just a wonderful, moving story about  love of photography. Read the article and see amazing photos from great photographers. By Ceri Jackson, BBC.

😊   Pelle

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/david_hurn_photographer_swaps_magnum

Swaps – Photographs from the David Hurn collections runs from 30 September 2017 to 11 March 2018 at the National Museum Cardiff

All you’ve got is a box with a hole at the front. That’s what we’ve all got and that’s all we’ve ever had since photography was invented.

“All that happens is the image of life out there goes whizzing through that lens and goes bang onto some material or other and you get a trace of that life on the back of the box. And you’ve got once chance at it, unlike painting or writing you can’t go back and edit, in photography the moment’s gone and will never happen again.

“So, all we have is this box with a hole in the front. So how come if there was a sheep dog trial for instance and Cartier-Bresson, McCullin and Bruce Davidson were there, they are all photographing exactly the same thing but if you showed me 10 pictures from that event I would be able to tell you who had taken what picture?

“It’s the signature of someone which can’t be contrived; it’s the purest thing to their real personality, the world seen through their eyes. The pictures are stamped with the unique style of the individual who shot them.

“But what is necessary for the authorship to come through is an impeccable command of the technical side. The best photographers might say ‘Oh, the technical side is unimportant’. Well, the technical side is staggeringly important but it has got to the point with them that they don’t have to think about it. That only comes through hard work and incessant practice.

“I always stress this point… you’re not a photographer because you are interested in photography.

“The picture is out there, you don’t make the picture, you just have a good visual eye and press the button at the right time. For that you must have an intense curiosity and tenacity, not just a passing visual interest, in the theme of the pictures. This curiosity leads to intense examination, reading, talking, research and many, many failed attempts.

“The idea that there’s no future in taking pictures is nonsensical. If you go to Smiths in Paddington station there’s 3,000 magazines for sale and they’ve all got pictures in them, they’re on websites.

“Everybody’s floundering a little bit as to how to make any money from it but those sorts of problems will be solved, clever people will find ways. Pictures are going to be needed there and the skills are still going to be the same.”

It is a measure of the force of the medium of photography that a picture that probably took a 60th of a second to shoot continues to fuel the life of another man 62 years on.