Tag Archives: Peace!

Now I wish I lived in London

The top 10 photography exhibitions of 2017.

I picked this up in The Guardian.  😊   Pelle

About the top image:  A still from Incoming by Richard Mosse. Photograph: Courtesy of the artist, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York and carlier|gebauer, Berlin.

Perhaps the most widely discussed exhibition of the year, Mosse’s vast three-screen video installation was not strictly photography, but addressed all the issues that the medium is freighted with as it negotiates the post-truth world. Shot on a hi-tech military surveillance camera that registers body heat from as far away as 30km, Incoming reimagined the contemporary refugee crisis as a Ballardian dystopian drama populated by spectral figures moving slowly through an alien landscape. Beautifully observed moments of heightened intimacy – a lone figure praying to Mecca amid the tumult around him – provide breathing space in an almost overwhelming audiovisual installation.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/dec/13/top-10-photography-exhibitions-of-2017

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I went fishing

Something that I don´t often do. However, with my dear friend Knut, his brother Asle and their wonderful friends in Norway it all went well. We caught lots of fish. Fishing is very relaxing. Also taking care of the net after is contemplative. We had so much of everything and nothing to talk about. First time I managed to photograph fishing as well.

Thanks Knut for letting me borrow your camera!

😊  Pelle

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The Observer W Eugene Smith, the photographer who wanted to record everything

Together with Avedon, Penn, Steichen, Strand, Arbus, Cartier-Bresson, Albert Watson and a few more, he is one of the truly great photographers. For me. They are all different and perhaps I should not compare them. So I don´t. Read the article from The Guardian, by Sean O `Hagan.

See the images and imagine the sound that he recorded.     😊   Pelle

Smith took many famous pictures, but also taped hours of audio of jazz greats, writers and artists of the day in his New York loft. A new book explores his strange world

Smith was perhaps the single most important American photographer in the development of the editorial photo essay. His visual narratives, usually published in Life magazine, were often brutally atmospheric. He evoked the horrors of the second world war in the Pacific, where he was injured by mortar fire, and chronicled the working life of Dr Ernest Ceriani in the small town of Kremmling, Colorado, in his 1948 series, Country Doctor, now recognised as the first extended editorial photo story.

In 1955, Smith became a member of the Magnum picture agency, travelling to Pittsburgh for his first assignment, which entailed producing 100 photographs in three weeks to mark the city’s first centenary. He worked on the project for three years, producing around 21,000 photographs. Today, his legacy is maintained by the W Eugene Smith Memorial Fund, which celebrates and encourages the kind of humanistic photography he pioneered, if not the impossible tasks he set himself and his beleaguered editors.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/aug/06/w-eugene-smith-photographer-record-everything

Gene Smith’s Sink by Sam Stephenson is published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux on 22 August ($26)

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A US soldier during the final days of fighting to gain control of the island of Saipan from occupying Japanese forces during the second world war. Photograph: W Eugene Smith/Life/Getty
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Smoke pours from the chimneys of an Ohio steel mill in a 1949 picture for Life magazine. Photograph: W Eugene Smith/Life/Getty
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Country doctor Ernest Ceriani photographed after having performed a caesarean section during which both baby and mother died due to complications. The picture, taken in Kremmling, Colorado, was part of Smith’s groundbreaking photo essay for Life magazine in 1948. Photograph: W Eugene Smith/Life/Getty

The photojournalism of Eddie Adams – in pictures

Once a photographer, always a photographer. You don´t have a career for 50 years if you´re not a photographer by heart. A great title for the book. 😊  Pelle

He was best known for his Pulitzer prize-winning photo, Saigon Execution, but Eddie Adams won over 500 awards for his work, throughout a 50-year career. Starting as a photographer in the marines, he covered war zones, refugees, riots and celebrities. Eddie Adams: Bigger Than The Frame is published by the University of Texas Press.

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/apr/10/eddie-adam-photojournalism-saigon-execution-pictures#img-7

From The Guardian.

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Servicemen lift President John F Kennedy’s casket off a caisson in front of the Capitol, 24 November 1963.

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Marine Corps recruit depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, 1970.

Still Going Strong

Great to see these images from a young Bod Dylan! I was happy to attend his first concert here in Stockholm last Saturday after that he received The Nobel price. A great concert by a great artist. He has changd his hat. 😊  Pelle

As Bob Dylan accepts his Nobel prize for literature this weekend, an exhibition of photographs of him on the cusp of international fame is planned to open in New York. The photographer Ted Russell first met Dylan in 1961 and his intimate pictures of Dylan performing, and at home, are the subject of a show at the Steven Kasher Gallery featuring dozens of images never before seen in the city. Bob Dylan NYC 1961–1964 opens on 20 April and will run until 3 June.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2017/apr/01/portraits-of-a-young-bob-dylan-in-pictures

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These forgotten shreds of plastic helped a photographer mourn his mom

Simple, beautiful and emotional. There are still great ideas and photographs out there just waiting to be made. 😊  Pelle

© Wes Bell, and the article was found in The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/13/these-forgotten-shreds-of-plastic-helped-a-photographer-mourn-his-mom/

Wes Bell’s series “Snag,” inspired by the death of his mother, takes a beautiful and simple idea and infuses an ordinary scene with great emotional power. There is beauty, loss and poetry in every frame. After 20 years in New York working as an international fashion photographer, Bell returned to his birthplace and to fine-art photography in Alberta, Canada.

In describing this work, Bell said: “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags, caught in barbed-wire fences that lined the ditches. Whipped violently by the wind, they were left shredded and lacerated, but trapped nonetheless in the no man’s land of boundary fences, neither here nor there. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance — Snag.”

Loss and remembrance are universal, and Bell makes feeling those emotions accessible and visible.

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Harry Benson Shooting Rock History

http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/pictures/revered-photographer-harry-benson-talks-iconic-shots-w454843

Being a music nerd myself I find these images wonderful. Some truly amazing images and stories to go with them.  Some images are composed while other let you hear the wings of music history. All the way from Sinatra to Beastie Boys. And now Dylan is coming to Stockholm, still going strong.

In a new documentary about his life and work, Harry Benson: Shoot First, his famous subjects-turned-admirers.

“what makes his photographs so memorable: they’re surprisingly candid and humanizing in a way that’s often lost in more controlled photography settings. “I hate studio pictures,” he told Rolling Stone earlier this week. “I like everything out of control. Like myself!” 

The article from Rolling Stone and all images © by Harry Benson.

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