Tag Archives: Fantasy

Old Town, Stockholm

The other day I went to Old Town here in Stockholm. Already filled with lots of tourists. A great place to be. Many cafés and restaurants. Galleries and shops. I went there to test a favorite lens. A TS 45 mm. I like the way I can handle it. Like how I work with my Sinar view  camera. Though it is so much smaller and comfortable to bring a SLR on a walk. This is how my images looks like. 😊 If you get a chance, visit our Old Town! You don´t have to walk among all the tourist shops. There are small adventures on every narrow side street. Perhaps you, as I did, just can stumble upon a small concert in a church.

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A Fine Selection

Believe me, without images to catch your interest…

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/here-are-22-of-the-weeks-best-photos/2017/03/31/494d66ba-118f-11e7-9b0d-d27c98455440_gallery.html?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-d%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.0fadab8ca845

😊  Pelle

These forgotten shreds of plastic helped a photographer mourn his mom

Simple, beautiful and emotional. There are still great ideas and photographs out there just waiting to be made. 😊  Pelle

© Wes Bell, and the article was found in The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/13/these-forgotten-shreds-of-plastic-helped-a-photographer-mourn-his-mom/

Wes Bell’s series “Snag,” inspired by the death of his mother, takes a beautiful and simple idea and infuses an ordinary scene with great emotional power. There is beauty, loss and poetry in every frame. After 20 years in New York working as an international fashion photographer, Bell returned to his birthplace and to fine-art photography in Alberta, Canada.

In describing this work, Bell said: “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags, caught in barbed-wire fences that lined the ditches. Whipped violently by the wind, they were left shredded and lacerated, but trapped nonetheless in the no man’s land of boundary fences, neither here nor there. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance — Snag.”

Loss and remembrance are universal, and Bell makes feeling those emotions accessible and visible.

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In pictures: Sacred geometries

A small group of photographers have turned their lenses on the urban landscape, seeking to capture the beauty of the architecture around us.

The images explore the idea of sacred geometries, the perfect mix of proportion and mathematical ratios that are pleasing to the eye and a reflection of those found in nature.

The pictures can be seen at the Anise Gallery in London until 15 April 2017.

I saw this in BBC, In Pictures.

😊  Pelle

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© Fernando Guerra
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© Hufton and Crow Photography
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© Doublespace

 

Was Diane Arbus the Most Radical Photographer of the 20th Century?

If you have ever seen a Diane Arbus photograph you will remember it, and her very personal style. That can only be said about few photographers.                                               Thank you Leif Skoogfors for sharing this interesting article.

© Diane Arbus

A new biography and Met exhibit show how she sacrificed her marriage, her friendships, and eventually her life for her career as an artist living on the edge.

By

Diane Arbus’s last known negative is labeled “#7459.” She found herself unable to imagine past that number.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/07/diane-arbus-c-v-r.html

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Finding patterns in Australian farmland

I´d like to go to Australia! Ladies and gentlemen I give you Josh Smith. 😊  Pelle

“The end game for me is producing these series as fine art”.

© all photographs Josh Smith. Article in BBC.

Flying high above farmland, photographer Josh Smith captures colours and patterns not usually associated with rural Australia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-38888453

_94006992_14305b65-2eab-412f-be37-17c11c9ddf16His often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006993_a1405267-ed49-4374-8fce-0f513f3eb09aHis often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006997_bd80a3ef-04b3-4ae9-89dd-c6b2ec69713b It was a hobby until 2011, when his aerial shots of floods in Queensland and New South Wales were featured in a major newspaper.

_94007052_fertappSo he took to the skies, hoping to draw attention to how food and clothing is produced.

_94007055_202a3807-1a9f-4245-923b-4738de7a0996“Here in Australia, we’ve got farmers producing the highest quality produce anywhere in the world,” he said.

Please like if you like, 😉 Pelle

Turning ordinary into magical

Ever so often I feel happy after I have seen a movie from India, France, Italy or from any other country when I don´t recognize the surroundings and/or the actors. Just as great is it seeing interesting photographs from India. More street photography from where the streets looks different. I found it in The Washington Post.

😊   Pelle

Amateur photographer presents new look at life in India

More often than not, photography coming out of India tends to focus on the “exotic.” We’ve seen the pictures many times before — people performing religious rites in the Ganges River or huge gatherings like the Kumb Mela. So it is refreshing to see work that diverges from this path. Swarat Ghosh’s photographs of street scenes in India do just that. Far from the spectacles we are used to seeing, Ghosh roams the streets transforming the ordinary and banal into the magical. With his photography, he takes us on a journey through found mini-dramas or tableaus that we might ordinarily miss if we’re not watching carefully enough.

Ghosh is not a professional photographer but an avid amateur and student of the medium. In his day job, Ghosh is a lead visual designer at a software company in Hyderabad. His earliest memory of photography was when he began following the work of several street photographers (including Kaushal Parekh and Prashant Godbole) based in India around 2012. His own journey into photography actually came about accidentally at that time when his wife gave him a camera that same year.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/02/08/turning-ordinary-into-magical-amateur-photographer-presents-new-look-at-life-in-india/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.d651cd86490b

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