Category Archives: Waves

Lady Jockeys’ Thoroughbred World Championship

The first Lady Jockeys’ Thoroughbred World Championship was held at Bro Park yesterday evening, on the 4th of July. Exciting! We had a french winner, Maryline Eon. One more competition before making choices and printing for The Derby at Jägersro.

Here is my selection of images from the event. It happened to be many telling eyes.

😊🏇😊  Pelle

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2017-04-24 at Bro Park

A selection from yesterdays races. Sun and snow coming down. It started off not good, as my camera didn´t expose more then one image at the time. After some time of intense problem solving I managed to get it working as I would like it to. There are so many things to choose when you are setting up an advanced digital camera. It ended up OK after all, and once again I learned about preparations. Especially with a new camera.  You are never too old to learn…

🌞🏇😊  Pelle

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These forgotten shreds of plastic helped a photographer mourn his mom

Simple, beautiful and emotional. There are still great ideas and photographs out there just waiting to be made. 😊  Pelle

© Wes Bell, and the article was found in The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/13/these-forgotten-shreds-of-plastic-helped-a-photographer-mourn-his-mom/

Wes Bell’s series “Snag,” inspired by the death of his mother, takes a beautiful and simple idea and infuses an ordinary scene with great emotional power. There is beauty, loss and poetry in every frame. After 20 years in New York working as an international fashion photographer, Bell returned to his birthplace and to fine-art photography in Alberta, Canada.

In describing this work, Bell said: “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags, caught in barbed-wire fences that lined the ditches. Whipped violently by the wind, they were left shredded and lacerated, but trapped nonetheless in the no man’s land of boundary fences, neither here nor there. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance — Snag.”

Loss and remembrance are universal, and Bell makes feeling those emotions accessible and visible.

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Massive landscapes, or just a trick…

More shots from above, but this time not so high up. The drones has gotten us into thinking in new patterns. The article from Washington Post. 😊  Pelle

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/15/massive-landscapes-deep-valleys-canyons-its-a-trick-of-the-eye-joe-philipsons-photographs-of-lines-in-the-sand/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.bf8318aea39f

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Photographer Joseph Philipson saw more than just cuts in the sand on the shores of Long Beach, Calif. He saw the “code that constructs our visual reality,” or the mathematical phenomenon of fractals, mathematical sets that show a repeating pattern at every scale. In nature, fractals can be seen not only on coastlines but also river systems, blood vessels and crystals, to name a few. Philipson noted to In Sight that his images could be “massive landscapes, deep valleys, canyons … it’s a trick of the eye but I’m really only maybe five feet over.”

 

Finding patterns in Australian farmland

I´d like to go to Australia! Ladies and gentlemen I give you Josh Smith. 😊  Pelle

“The end game for me is producing these series as fine art”.

© all photographs Josh Smith. Article in BBC.

Flying high above farmland, photographer Josh Smith captures colours and patterns not usually associated with rural Australia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-38888453

_94006992_14305b65-2eab-412f-be37-17c11c9ddf16His often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006993_a1405267-ed49-4374-8fce-0f513f3eb09aHis often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006997_bd80a3ef-04b3-4ae9-89dd-c6b2ec69713b It was a hobby until 2011, when his aerial shots of floods in Queensland and New South Wales were featured in a major newspaper.

_94007052_fertappSo he took to the skies, hoping to draw attention to how food and clothing is produced.

_94007055_202a3807-1a9f-4245-923b-4738de7a0996“Here in Australia, we’ve got farmers producing the highest quality produce anywhere in the world,” he said.

Please like if you like, 😉 Pelle

Up up and away

Here is another set of drone photography. One perhaps considered as a selfie. Nature from above is often very graphical and beautiful. Just look at these images. Hmmm, just thinking, how many are falling from the sky?

Aerial photography platform SkyPixel received 27,000 entries to its 2016 competition. Here are the winning shots plus some of The Guardians favourites. SkyPixel’s competition was open to both professional and amateur photographers and was split into three categories: Beauty, 360, and Drones in Use.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/gallery/2017/jan/25/worlds-best-drone-photography-skypixel-competition

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