Category Archives: Wildlife

I went fishing

Something that I don´t often do. However, with my dear friend Knut, his brother Asle and their wonderful friends in Norway it all went well. We caught lots of fish. Fishing is very relaxing. Also taking care of the net after is contemplative. We had so much of everything and nothing to talk about. First time I managed to photograph fishing as well.

Thanks Knut for letting me borrow your camera!

😊  Pelle

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The way I do it

If I shoot 24×36, 6×6, 4×5″ or any other format, 9 times out of 10 I compose and fill the full frame. Just a way I started many years ago and just a way I still work.

From yesterdays races at Bro Park. Enjoy!

😊🏇😊  Pelle

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Massive landscapes, or just a trick…

More shots from above, but this time not so high up. The drones has gotten us into thinking in new patterns. The article from Washington Post. 😊  Pelle

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/15/massive-landscapes-deep-valleys-canyons-its-a-trick-of-the-eye-joe-philipsons-photographs-of-lines-in-the-sand/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.bf8318aea39f

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Photographer Joseph Philipson saw more than just cuts in the sand on the shores of Long Beach, Calif. He saw the “code that constructs our visual reality,” or the mathematical phenomenon of fractals, mathematical sets that show a repeating pattern at every scale. In nature, fractals can be seen not only on coastlines but also river systems, blood vessels and crystals, to name a few. Philipson noted to In Sight that his images could be “massive landscapes, deep valleys, canyons … it’s a trick of the eye but I’m really only maybe five feet over.”

 

Finding patterns in Australian farmland

I´d like to go to Australia! Ladies and gentlemen I give you Josh Smith. 😊  Pelle

“The end game for me is producing these series as fine art”.

© all photographs Josh Smith. Article in BBC.

Flying high above farmland, photographer Josh Smith captures colours and patterns not usually associated with rural Australia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-38888453

_94006992_14305b65-2eab-412f-be37-17c11c9ddf16His often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006993_a1405267-ed49-4374-8fce-0f513f3eb09aHis often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006997_bd80a3ef-04b3-4ae9-89dd-c6b2ec69713b It was a hobby until 2011, when his aerial shots of floods in Queensland and New South Wales were featured in a major newspaper.

_94007052_fertappSo he took to the skies, hoping to draw attention to how food and clothing is produced.

_94007055_202a3807-1a9f-4245-923b-4738de7a0996“Here in Australia, we’ve got farmers producing the highest quality produce anywhere in the world,” he said.

Please like if you like, 😉 Pelle

Up up and away

Here is another set of drone photography. One perhaps considered as a selfie. Nature from above is often very graphical and beautiful. Just look at these images. Hmmm, just thinking, how many are falling from the sky?

Aerial photography platform SkyPixel received 27,000 entries to its 2016 competition. Here are the winning shots plus some of The Guardians favourites. SkyPixel’s competition was open to both professional and amateur photographers and was split into three categories: Beauty, 360, and Drones in Use.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/gallery/2017/jan/25/worlds-best-drone-photography-skypixel-competition

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The Art of Building 2016

The 15 finalists of this year’s Art of Building architectural photography competition have been selected from thousands of entries. Here ( BBC ) we present the photos along with a comment from each photographer.

http://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-38301001

I picked these up at BBC. I like the one with ladders especially. That is also an art of building a building. 😉

About the above image: Jonathan Walland: “This is part of a series of photographs demonstrating how the absence of light can be used to divert the attention of the observer towards what the photographer intended to highlight.”

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Michele Palazzo: “New York City’s iconic Flatiron building emerges from the blizzard, like the bow of a giant ship ploughing through the wind and the snow. Taken during the historic coastal storm, Jonas, on 23 January 2016, the photograph went viral during the aftermath of the storm.”

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Enrique Gimenez-Velilla: “This photo seeks to pay homage to all the clever unknown workers that still build and maintain built infrastructure in the developing world.”

_92948185_12_the_gherkin_by_james_tarryJames Tarry: “This series is about looking past imperfections and ‘incorrect’ architectural photography techniques. The expired Kodak Ektachrome was developed in the ‘wrong’ chemicals to produce these big slabs of often other-worldly colour. These are flawed and hopefully challenging, just like some of the buildings themselves.”

See the entries for National Geographic’s Nature Photographer of the Year contest

http://wpo.st/SvQC2

You have seen some of these earlier in my blog. Many great images. The opportunity comes slow like a snail and disappears like a lightning. You better be prepared!

Four female lions fight a pack of 16 hyenas over a kudu that the hyenas had killed at a watering hole in Etosha National Park in Namibia in the late evening. The hyenas won

Photo by © NingYu Pao/2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

😊  Pelle

I picked it up in The Washington Post.