Category Archives: -Dyslexia

My choice

Yesterday the 6/6 was our national holiday here in Sweden with the annual horse racing at Gärdet, Nationaldagsgaloppen. The sun was shining and people came with blankets, picnic and wine. Or just water. It was a warm and hot day. I think the jockeys enjoyed themselves competing much closer to their audience and fans. There are not so many races on grass, so I like this, and dirt track is mostly not enough dirty …

Here is my selection from the exciting day. 😊 🏇 ☀️  Pelle

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Turning ordinary into magical

Ever so often I feel happy after I have seen a movie from India, France, Italy or from any other country when I don´t recognize the surroundings and/or the actors. Just as great is it seeing interesting photographs from India. More street photography from where the streets looks different. I found it in The Washington Post.

😊   Pelle

Amateur photographer presents new look at life in India

More often than not, photography coming out of India tends to focus on the “exotic.” We’ve seen the pictures many times before — people performing religious rites in the Ganges River or huge gatherings like the Kumb Mela. So it is refreshing to see work that diverges from this path. Swarat Ghosh’s photographs of street scenes in India do just that. Far from the spectacles we are used to seeing, Ghosh roams the streets transforming the ordinary and banal into the magical. With his photography, he takes us on a journey through found mini-dramas or tableaus that we might ordinarily miss if we’re not watching carefully enough.

Ghosh is not a professional photographer but an avid amateur and student of the medium. In his day job, Ghosh is a lead visual designer at a software company in Hyderabad. His earliest memory of photography was when he began following the work of several street photographers (including Kaushal Parekh and Prashant Godbole) based in India around 2012. His own journey into photography actually came about accidentally at that time when his wife gave him a camera that same year.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/02/08/turning-ordinary-into-magical-amateur-photographer-presents-new-look-at-life-in-india/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.d651cd86490b

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Up up and away, again

At the time for the first moon landing I read all there was and cut it out from all magazines and newspapers. I still got it all in my files. Now some of those famous photographs, and some not known,  are up for auction. That was also a historical moment for Hasselblad, the Swedish camera manufacturer. A small step for man, but a giant step for mankind…

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2017/jan/31/spacewalks-and-moon-landings-nasa-auctions-archive-photos

😊  Pelle

Whatever you think

This is a very interesting article about people who thought they could photograph thoughts. Whatever you think, and I, the images with the old hand writing are beautiful.  It is artistic. Perhaps even art…?

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170116-the-man-who-tried-to-photograph-thoughts-and-dreams

Images courtesy of The Institute for Frontier Areas of Psychology and Mental Health (IGPP) in Germany. Article by Josh Gabbatiss in BBC.

😊   Pelle

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Looking at readers

People do read, everywhere in the world. Notice that none of the persons in these images are reading on a phone or a computer. I like that, and I like reading. I´d rather read the book instead of seeing a movie from the book. Then I am doing the interpretations and I am setting the cast. My imagination is working for me.

A new book brings together Steve McCurry’s photos of readers, spanning 30 countries. From a steelworks in Serbia to a classroom in Kashmir, they reveal the power of the printed word.

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Without the word, without the writing of books, there is no history, there is no concept of humanity.

Back in 1930, Hesse argued that “We need not fear a future elimination of the book. On the contrary, the more that certain needs for entertainment and education are satisfied through other inventions, the more the book will win back in dignity and authority. For even the most childish intoxication with progress will soon be forced to recognise that writing and books have a function that is eternal.”

Many years ago I was given a book with the mentioned André Kertész reading images, and that book is still one of my favorites. Thank you Bruno!

I found the article at BBC. All images are © Steve McCurry.

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170116-striking-photos-of-readers-around-the-world?ocid=ww.social.link.email

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This book came out in 1975, and I understand that an original in a larger format was released in 1971.