Category Archives: Paper

I admit

That I don´t often get too impressed by photography that I see. But this is just wonderful. I think! 😀  Pelle

 From Washington Post

Timeless tintypes of the world’s most photographed subjects

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/12/19/timeless-tintypes-of-the-worlds-most-photographed-subjects/?hpid=hp_hp-visual-stories-desktop_no-name%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.854c17288b1e

At Sundance Film Festival, photographer Victoria Will had just minutes with some of Hollywood’s most famous actors and directors — arguably, some of the most photographed people in the world — but she chose a process that at its core is imperfect: tintype.

The 19th century wet-plate photography process predates film. There are no negatives, no large digital files or multiple frames, and no do-overs. Each image is one of a kind.

It starts in the darkroom, where each plate must be coated by hand with light sensitive emulsion. The exposure starts with a comically blinding amount of light, which is reflected off the subject into the camera lens and onto the aluminum plate still wet with emulsion. Any dry patches will remain undeveloped. It is an unforgiving medium. It also makes each image undeniably unique.

“I love that when you make a tintype you are making a thing, a physical photographic object — one that you can hold and experience in a different way,” Will told In Sight. “But I also love the finicky nature of the chemistry. Each plate is one of a kind. In the digital age these two aspects of the medium really inspire me.”

On one of the last pages of the book is a quote from Walker Evans: “The eye traffics in feelings, not in thoughts.” When asked, Will said it sums up what she loves and why she is so drawn to photography. “A successful image for me is one that makes you feel. It needs to touch you in some way,” she said. “I think unconsciously, and clearly articulated by Evans here, photographers are moved by emotion. That’s what is actually pushing the shutter.”

Skärmavbild 2017-12-20 kl. 11.26.39

Advertisements

Looking at readers

People do read, everywhere in the world. Notice that none of the persons in these images are reading on a phone or a computer. I like that, and I like reading. I´d rather read the book instead of seeing a movie from the book. Then I am doing the interpretations and I am setting the cast. My imagination is working for me.

A new book brings together Steve McCurry’s photos of readers, spanning 30 countries. From a steelworks in Serbia to a classroom in Kashmir, they reveal the power of the printed word.

p04ppqcj

p04pprm7

Without the word, without the writing of books, there is no history, there is no concept of humanity.

Back in 1930, Hesse argued that “We need not fear a future elimination of the book. On the contrary, the more that certain needs for entertainment and education are satisfied through other inventions, the more the book will win back in dignity and authority. For even the most childish intoxication with progress will soon be forced to recognise that writing and books have a function that is eternal.”

Many years ago I was given a book with the mentioned André Kertész reading images, and that book is still one of my favorites. Thank you Bruno!

I found the article at BBC. All images are © Steve McCurry.

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170116-striking-photos-of-readers-around-the-world?ocid=ww.social.link.email

on-reading

This book came out in 1975, and I understand that an original in a larger format was released in 1971.

A photographer’s poetic images of paper

Whao!!! Amazing and beautiful. The best i have seen for a very long time.

I found it, to my happiness, in The Washington Post. See the whole series with the link.

“Counterpoint #11.” (Scott F. Smith) is the image above.

There is no guiding force in Scott F. Smith‘s series, “Paper,” except instinct. Beginning with a pristine sheet, Smith makes a series of clean slices. It’s an engaging process of delicate manipulations: pulling the paper, carving it, and modulating light to reveal its inner corridors.

In addition to his studio lighting setup, Smith has a collection of tiny flashlights that he uses to target nooks in his pieces. He uses them to experiment on various types of paper.

Smith is fascinated with the idea of using simple materials as a conduit for expressing different qualities of light. It started when he was a photography student and was given a “white on white” assignment — shooting a white object on a white background — to demonstrate that a huge range of tones could be produced by harnessing light. Smith has since also studied light’s interaction with stone and ice.

Having worked for years printing photographs in darkrooms before going digital, part of this project is connected to his nostalgia for the manual parts of the process. “The draw is just the physical connection,” he said, “In the old days when you had a print in the developer, or you try to massage highlights to get details. … It’s a way to stay in touch with physical, tactile engagement with materials.”

The paper in this project, though, is simply a means to an end. Although he hasn’t thrown any of his paper pieces out (“I’m a little attached,” he said), he primarily hangs on to them to show viewers what his pieces are made of. His main goal is to create abstract images that remind the viewers of other objects or emotions. The most important thing in Smith’s eyes is not the paper, but the resulting photograph.

http://wpo.st/ZTH92

imrs-4

imrs-5

😊 Pelle