Tag Archives: Water

London as seen by homeless photographers – in pictures

 

A great idea with some great photos.

I found the article in The Guardian.

😊    Pelle

Advertisements

More water

Seconds after looking at those wunderful waves, here is more water that I just discovered. Through another photographers lens and they look so different. But just as amazing. I think. See the slide show for more images.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/27/magazine/toshio-shibatas-mesmerizing-photographs-of-water.html?_r=0#

The Japanese photographer Toshio Shibata is fascinated by water — in particular, the way it interacts with man-made structures. For the later half of his almost-40-year career in photography, he has explored this relationship in novel ways, hiding horizon lines and taking the perspective of the water itself with his camera, visually evoking its rushing sound.

Each of Shibata’s photographs depicts a different kind of human intervention in the natural movement of water, many of them the kind of mundane engineering projects we rarely think about. “To me,” Jacob Cartwright of Laurence Miller Gallery, which recently opened a show of Shibata’s work, said via email, “the essence of his work is taking ubiquitous yet frequently disregarded parts of our contemporary landscape and transforming them into something visually uncanny through formal invention.”

Worlds best, again

There is, probably, a worlds best in everything. Also in photographing waves. The photographs are amazing and in the film, he explains more. Things I never thought about in my little pond. It is all in the details. I will not argue about his talent and I love that he goes into the water. He is not on land with a long lens, he is really up close. Not afraid of getting wet. Any competition out there?

At first glance, these photographs look like looming mountains, standing guard over a dark universe found in a Tolkien novel. But look again: These images are actually the ocean’s waves, captured at their peak point of crash. It’s almost spooky how powerful they feel.

Photographer Ray Collins is the man behind these amazing images, which seem to capture the wave’s most crucial moment, just before it crashes and sinks back into the water. Collins bought his camera in 2007 with the hopes of shooting his surfer friends, but quickly found that he had a knack for photographing the water. His photos have been so successful, in fact, that they have been used in international campaigns for National Geographic, Patagonia, and Apple.

http://www.lifebuzz.com/sea-mountains/

lifebuzz-da562a508673c137942ad2c09e8c9d79-limit_2000