Tag Archives: Art photography

Rotterdam next

Years ago I saw one of his exhibitions in Milan. Great images, also in size, and a great show! Now I certainly like to go to Rotterdam.

https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2016/aug/07/peter-lindbergh-i-dont-retouch-anything-a-different-vision-on-fashion-photography

Peter Lindbergh: A Different Vision on Fashion Photography is at the Kunsthal Rotterdam from 10 September 2016-12 February 2017 (kunsthal.nl)

“He has such strong themes. You can immediately say, ‘That’s a Lindbergh image’ because of the timelessness of the portraits, without make-up, without hair. They never date.”

Lindbergh does what he does. And as long as you don’t try to retouch what he does, he is happy.

Magazines have to sign a contract agreeing not to do any retouching, otherwise, he says, it happens. “The cosmetic companies have everyone brainwashed. I don’t retouch anything. ‘Oh, but she looks tired!’ they say. So what if she looks tired? Tired and beautiful.”

There is more interesting things to read in the article. I found it in The Guardian.

(The above image was cropped by the Word Press app.)

😊 Pelle

Svenskt Derby på Jägersro den 16/7

-och jag skall ställa ut.

Välkomna till Jägersro den 16/7! Till min mycket stora glädje skall jag ställa ut ett urval av mina galoppbilder under dagen. Det är särskilt roligt då mitt intresse för sporten väcktes just där för precis ett år sedan. Bilderna visas på printar i storlek 70×100 cm.

Varmt välkomna!

-and I will be exhibiting.

Welcome to Jägersro the 16th of July. Jägersro is the race track for horse racing in Malmö. I am especially happy for this since my interest for the sport started just here one year ago.  I have made a selection from my horse racing images and they will be exhibited on prints in size 70×100 cm..

A warm welcome to you all!

https://www.svenskgalopp.se/artikel?cid=1.545865&defaultMenuId=true

Once upon a time

Take a look at these wunderful images in the article. Read the texts and you understand that this is no ordinary b/w prints that are tinted. Amazing work! I read this in The Guardian.

Text for the above image.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/jul/04/photochromes-swiss-camera-museum-hans-jakob-schmid-in-pictures

Remember that photographers had to use b/w or color film years ago. Or just b/w if it was many years ago. Today it is easier with everything built into a camera.

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Finally: Now I have seen the question, again. Is photography art? In my opinion YES it could be, but not every photograph is. Far from!

😀 Pelle

Fan Who?

I just read that the photographer Fan Ho has passed away at the age of 85. I did n´t know about him but I like to share what I just learned with you. His work is fantastic! It is not difficult to understand that he was called the Bresson of the East. I first learned about him in an article in http://www.dpreview.com. The top link. The second link is to his homepage. Really colorful w/w images. It really shows that good photography has no age. It is timeless.

Please excuse my little joke in the headline, but I had never heard of him before.

Images © Fan Ho

http://www.dpreview.com/news/6315115603/remembering-fan-ho-1937-2016/1

http://www.fanhophotography.com/index.html

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😊 Pelle

6th of June Horse Race

Yesterday was national holiday in Sweden and the annual horse race at Gärdet. A huge recreation field here in Stockholm. The track that is rebuilt every year at this place is not flat as most other tracks. I think that the jockeys like it. The weather was sunny and there was a huge audience that were allowed in for free. Here is my selection from my 1148 exposures.

😀  Pelle

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Also some of the horses were dressed for the ocation

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More water

Seconds after looking at those wunderful waves, here is more water that I just discovered. Through another photographers lens and they look so different. But just as amazing. I think. See the slide show for more images.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/27/magazine/toshio-shibatas-mesmerizing-photographs-of-water.html?_r=0#

The Japanese photographer Toshio Shibata is fascinated by water — in particular, the way it interacts with man-made structures. For the later half of his almost-40-year career in photography, he has explored this relationship in novel ways, hiding horizon lines and taking the perspective of the water itself with his camera, visually evoking its rushing sound.

Each of Shibata’s photographs depicts a different kind of human intervention in the natural movement of water, many of them the kind of mundane engineering projects we rarely think about. “To me,” Jacob Cartwright of Laurence Miller Gallery, which recently opened a show of Shibata’s work, said via email, “the essence of his work is taking ubiquitous yet frequently disregarded parts of our contemporary landscape and transforming them into something visually uncanny through formal invention.”

Worlds best, again

There is, probably, a worlds best in everything. Also in photographing waves. The photographs are amazing and in the film, he explains more. Things I never thought about in my little pond. It is all in the details. I will not argue about his talent and I love that he goes into the water. He is not on land with a long lens, he is really up close. Not afraid of getting wet. Any competition out there?

At first glance, these photographs look like looming mountains, standing guard over a dark universe found in a Tolkien novel. But look again: These images are actually the ocean’s waves, captured at their peak point of crash. It’s almost spooky how powerful they feel.

Photographer Ray Collins is the man behind these amazing images, which seem to capture the wave’s most crucial moment, just before it crashes and sinks back into the water. Collins bought his camera in 2007 with the hopes of shooting his surfer friends, but quickly found that he had a knack for photographing the water. His photos have been so successful, in fact, that they have been used in international campaigns for National Geographic, Patagonia, and Apple.

http://www.lifebuzz.com/sea-mountains/

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Philippe Halsman

The man who made Marilyn fly: Philippe Halsman’s stunt shots – in pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/oct/23/philippe-halsman-astonish-me-in-pictures

 

Marilyn Monroe in mid-air, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis goofing off, the Duke of Windsor in his socks, and Salvador Dalí nose to nose with a rhino – Halsman’s freaky frames defied gravity and convention

The top image is a true classic. Not made with a modern SLR capturing 10 images per sec. A true master of the trade!

See for yourselves!

😊 Pelle

 

Lost and found

The Swedish photographer Håkan Ludwigson spent time in Australia in the 1980´s covering cowboys. But: Håkan Ludwigson’s images showcase the brutal beauty of Australia’s cattlemen and women. Shot in the 1980s and initially unappreciated for being too graphic, they form an uncompromising study of outback life and the individuals who pursue it.

Too graphic? Are you kidding? Isn´t that what makes images strong and interesting. However after all these years they are finally being presented in a book. Balls and bulldust / Steidl Books.

First a link to the article ( in The Guardian ) and then a link to the publisher with more great images. The square format is the Hasselblad Trade Mark. Håkan masters it and mentiones that because he was using middle format it was not the same as 35mm. He worked slower. Sometimes he also used flash  and that slowed the process even more. The result is amazing and I am happy that these great images finally can get the audience they deserve.

I am wondering.  Because he is from a country very far away from Australia, how does that effect his eyes and senses to this strange and different world? Are they more sensitive perhaps than if he was Australian? Perhaps…

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/nov/04/balls-and-bulldust-the-raw-1980s-photos-of-cattle-stations-that-time-almost-forgot

https://steidl.de/Books/Balls-and-Bulldust-1420273438.html

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Best of the rejected

I can only laugh. The other day I gave my own images a second chance. Now I find these images that are rejected from a juried art show, but good enough to get a second chance. In another exhibition.

This is something I often wonder about exhibitions. How does the other images look like, the ones not chosen. Would i like them more? On the other hand it is a different thing altogether to see an exhibition that makes you upset or angry. It gets you going and sometimes that is much more creative. I think. In so many competitions, second best is often best.

Portrait Salon describes itself as a salon des refuses – an exhibition of works rejected from a juried art show. Founded by Carole Evans and James O Jenkins in 2011 it aims to showcase the best of the rejected images from the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize, which is organized annually by the National Portrait Gallery (NPG), in London.

This portrait of Frank Carter is by London-based Phil Sharp.

http://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-34710461

http://www.portraitsalon.co.uk/

I found this in BBC, of course.

😊 Pelle