Tag Archives: Production

Was Diane Arbus the Most Radical Photographer of the 20th Century?

If you have ever seen a Diane Arbus photograph you will remember it, and her very personal style. That can only be said about few photographers.                                               Thank you Leif Skoogfors for sharing this interesting article.

© Diane Arbus

A new biography and Met exhibit show how she sacrificed her marriage, her friendships, and eventually her life for her career as an artist living on the edge.

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Diane Arbus’s last known negative is labeled “#7459.” She found herself unable to imagine past that number.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/07/diane-arbus-c-v-r.html

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For the love of a good camera – in pictures

From Lily Cole posing with a supersized Pentax to Bill Brandt hiding behind his Kodak wide-angle, cameras are the stars of this collection of snaps and selfies. 

Featured image at the top:

Many photographers are posing on their selfies with a camera, this is only natural. I guess. As you can see also the top photographers have thought of the same idea for their work. I wish I could visit the exhibition to see some of my favorites. 🌞 Pelle

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Finding patterns in Australian farmland

I´d like to go to Australia! Ladies and gentlemen I give you Josh Smith. 😊  Pelle

“The end game for me is producing these series as fine art”.

© all photographs Josh Smith. Article in BBC.

Flying high above farmland, photographer Josh Smith captures colours and patterns not usually associated with rural Australia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-38888453

_94006992_14305b65-2eab-412f-be37-17c11c9ddf16His often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006993_a1405267-ed49-4374-8fce-0f513f3eb09aHis often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006997_bd80a3ef-04b3-4ae9-89dd-c6b2ec69713b It was a hobby until 2011, when his aerial shots of floods in Queensland and New South Wales were featured in a major newspaper.

_94007052_fertappSo he took to the skies, hoping to draw attention to how food and clothing is produced.

_94007055_202a3807-1a9f-4245-923b-4738de7a0996“Here in Australia, we’ve got farmers producing the highest quality produce anywhere in the world,” he said.

Please like if you like, 😉 Pelle

Turning ordinary into magical

Ever so often I feel happy after I have seen a movie from India, France, Italy or from any other country when I don´t recognize the surroundings and/or the actors. Just as great is it seeing interesting photographs from India. More street photography from where the streets looks different. I found it in The Washington Post.

😊   Pelle

Amateur photographer presents new look at life in India

More often than not, photography coming out of India tends to focus on the “exotic.” We’ve seen the pictures many times before — people performing religious rites in the Ganges River or huge gatherings like the Kumb Mela. So it is refreshing to see work that diverges from this path. Swarat Ghosh’s photographs of street scenes in India do just that. Far from the spectacles we are used to seeing, Ghosh roams the streets transforming the ordinary and banal into the magical. With his photography, he takes us on a journey through found mini-dramas or tableaus that we might ordinarily miss if we’re not watching carefully enough.

Ghosh is not a professional photographer but an avid amateur and student of the medium. In his day job, Ghosh is a lead visual designer at a software company in Hyderabad. His earliest memory of photography was when he began following the work of several street photographers (including Kaushal Parekh and Prashant Godbole) based in India around 2012. His own journey into photography actually came about accidentally at that time when his wife gave him a camera that same year.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/02/08/turning-ordinary-into-magical-amateur-photographer-presents-new-look-at-life-in-india/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.d651cd86490b

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Trash, or Not Trash!

It sometimes happens that you see photographs that you wished you had done yourself. For me, like these. The gloves I have made, but not the other. I like this. It is colorful, playful and provokes a thought about our consumption society.

Stuart Haygarth walked from Kent to Land’s End, picking up the trash he found on beaches – and arranged it into collections that show us how weird the ordinary objects in our lives can be.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/apr/11/stuart-haygarth-strand-book-beach-trash-flotsam-england

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The last box camera in Santiago, Chile – in pictures

Everything is not digital these days. Another place, but the same time. 😊 Pelle

Luis Maldonado is the last remaining photographer in the main square of the Chilean capital still using a wooden box camera.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2017/jan/30/the-last-box-camera-in-santiago-chile-in-pictures?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Back to the future

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38815948

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The inventors of digital cameras have won the highest international engineering prize.

This year’s £1m Queen Elizabeth Prize recognises the development of the technologies that turn light into digital signals.

The Royal Academy of Engineering judging panel said the inventors’ work had “revolutionised” the world.

It sure did…😊                  This story was told by BBC.

My first digital camera was a 4×5″ scanner, a Dicomed, with a file size of 129 mb.

A study of industry data by Prof Fossum suggests that 100 digital cameras are made every second and a billion photos are uploaded each day.

Asked if he was proud that his development gave rise to a technology that is so ubiquitous, Dr Tompsett told BBC News he had some mixed feelings. Yes, he felt some pride, but he “also felt the opposite”.

“I feel frustrated by all these people who have cameras, taking pictures of everything in sight – and selfies. You are walking along and a selfie stick suddenly appears.”

And he added wryly: “I sometimes think whoever invented this technology should be dealt with.”

Up up and away, again

At the time for the first moon landing I read all there was and cut it out from all magazines and newspapers. I still got it all in my files. Now some of those famous photographs, and some not known,  are up for auction. That was also a historical moment for Hasselblad, the Swedish camera manufacturer. A small step for man, but a giant step for mankind…

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2017/jan/31/spacewalks-and-moon-landings-nasa-auctions-archive-photos

😊  Pelle

Up up and away

Here is another set of drone photography. One perhaps considered as a selfie. Nature from above is often very graphical and beautiful. Just look at these images. Hmmm, just thinking, how many are falling from the sky?

Aerial photography platform SkyPixel received 27,000 entries to its 2016 competition. Here are the winning shots plus some of The Guardians favourites. SkyPixel’s competition was open to both professional and amateur photographers and was split into three categories: Beauty, 360, and Drones in Use.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/gallery/2017/jan/25/worlds-best-drone-photography-skypixel-competition

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The Art of Building 2016

The 15 finalists of this year’s Art of Building architectural photography competition have been selected from thousands of entries. Here ( BBC ) we present the photos along with a comment from each photographer.

http://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-38301001

I picked these up at BBC. I like the one with ladders especially. That is also an art of building a building. 😉

About the above image: Jonathan Walland: “This is part of a series of photographs demonstrating how the absence of light can be used to divert the attention of the observer towards what the photographer intended to highlight.”

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Michele Palazzo: “New York City’s iconic Flatiron building emerges from the blizzard, like the bow of a giant ship ploughing through the wind and the snow. Taken during the historic coastal storm, Jonas, on 23 January 2016, the photograph went viral during the aftermath of the storm.”

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Enrique Gimenez-Velilla: “This photo seeks to pay homage to all the clever unknown workers that still build and maintain built infrastructure in the developing world.”

_92948185_12_the_gherkin_by_james_tarryJames Tarry: “This series is about looking past imperfections and ‘incorrect’ architectural photography techniques. The expired Kodak Ektachrome was developed in the ‘wrong’ chemicals to produce these big slabs of often other-worldly colour. These are flawed and hopefully challenging, just like some of the buildings themselves.”