Category Archives: Memories

Still Going Strong

Great to see these images from a young Bod Dylan! I was happy to attend his first concert here in Stockholm last Saturday after that he received The Nobel price. A great concert by a great artist. He has changd his hat. 😊  Pelle

As Bob Dylan accepts his Nobel prize for literature this weekend, an exhibition of photographs of him on the cusp of international fame is planned to open in New York. The photographer Ted Russell first met Dylan in 1961 and his intimate pictures of Dylan performing, and at home, are the subject of a show at the Steven Kasher Gallery featuring dozens of images never before seen in the city. Bob Dylan NYC 1961–1964 opens on 20 April and will run until 3 June.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2017/apr/01/portraits-of-a-young-bob-dylan-in-pictures

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These forgotten shreds of plastic helped a photographer mourn his mom

Simple, beautiful and emotional. There are still great ideas and photographs out there just waiting to be made. 😊  Pelle

© Wes Bell, and the article was found in The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/03/13/these-forgotten-shreds-of-plastic-helped-a-photographer-mourn-his-mom/

Wes Bell’s series “Snag,” inspired by the death of his mother, takes a beautiful and simple idea and infuses an ordinary scene with great emotional power. There is beauty, loss and poetry in every frame. After 20 years in New York working as an international fashion photographer, Bell returned to his birthplace and to fine-art photography in Alberta, Canada.

In describing this work, Bell said: “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags, caught in barbed-wire fences that lined the ditches. Whipped violently by the wind, they were left shredded and lacerated, but trapped nonetheless in the no man’s land of boundary fences, neither here nor there. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance — Snag.”

Loss and remembrance are universal, and Bell makes feeling those emotions accessible and visible.

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A Photograph Never Stands Alone

Interesting read from NY Times written by Teju Cole. Teju Cole is the magazine’s photography critic and the author, most recently, of the essay collection “Known and Strange Things.” Read more in the full article!

Images make us think of other images. Photographs remind us of other photographs, and perhaps only the earliest photographs had a chance to evade this fate. But soon after the invention of photography, the world was full of photographs, and newly made photographs could not avoid semantic contamination. Each photograph came to seem like a quotation from the great archive of photographs. Even the earliest photographs are themselves now burdened by this reality, because when we look at them, we do so in the knowledge of everything that came after. All images, regardless of the date of their creation, exist simultaneously and are pressed into service to help us make sense of other images. This suggests a possible approach to photography criticism: a river of interconnected images wordlessly but fluently commenting on one another.

A photograph can’t help taming what it shows. We are accustomed to speaking about photographs as though they were identical to their subject matter. But photographs are also pictures — organized forms on a two-dimensional surface — and they are part of the history of pictures. A picture of something terrible will always be caught between two worlds: the world of “something terrible,” which might shock us or move us to a moral response, and the world of “a picture,” which generates an aesthetic response. The dazzle of art and the bitterness of life are yoked to each other. There is no escape.

 

Was Diane Arbus the Most Radical Photographer of the 20th Century?

If you have ever seen a Diane Arbus photograph you will remember it, and her very personal style. That can only be said about few photographers.                                               Thank you Leif Skoogfors for sharing this interesting article.

© Diane Arbus

A new biography and Met exhibit show how she sacrificed her marriage, her friendships, and eventually her life for her career as an artist living on the edge.

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Diane Arbus’s last known negative is labeled “#7459.” She found herself unable to imagine past that number.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/07/diane-arbus-c-v-r.html

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For the love of a good camera – in pictures

From Lily Cole posing with a supersized Pentax to Bill Brandt hiding behind his Kodak wide-angle, cameras are the stars of this collection of snaps and selfies. 

Featured image at the top:

Many photographers are posing on their selfies with a camera, this is only natural. I guess. As you can see also the top photographers have thought of the same idea for their work. I wish I could visit the exhibition to see some of my favorites. 🌞 Pelle

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Trash, or Not Trash!

It sometimes happens that you see photographs that you wished you had done yourself. For me, like these. The gloves I have made, but not the other. I like this. It is colorful, playful and provokes a thought about our consumption society.

Stuart Haygarth walked from Kent to Land’s End, picking up the trash he found on beaches – and arranged it into collections that show us how weird the ordinary objects in our lives can be.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/apr/11/stuart-haygarth-strand-book-beach-trash-flotsam-england

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The last box camera in Santiago, Chile – in pictures

Everything is not digital these days. Another place, but the same time. 😊 Pelle

Luis Maldonado is the last remaining photographer in the main square of the Chilean capital still using a wooden box camera.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2017/jan/30/the-last-box-camera-in-santiago-chile-in-pictures?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Back to the future

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38815948

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The inventors of digital cameras have won the highest international engineering prize.

This year’s £1m Queen Elizabeth Prize recognises the development of the technologies that turn light into digital signals.

The Royal Academy of Engineering judging panel said the inventors’ work had “revolutionised” the world.

It sure did…😊                  This story was told by BBC.

My first digital camera was a 4×5″ scanner, a Dicomed, with a file size of 129 mb.

A study of industry data by Prof Fossum suggests that 100 digital cameras are made every second and a billion photos are uploaded each day.

Asked if he was proud that his development gave rise to a technology that is so ubiquitous, Dr Tompsett told BBC News he had some mixed feelings. Yes, he felt some pride, but he “also felt the opposite”.

“I feel frustrated by all these people who have cameras, taking pictures of everything in sight – and selfies. You are walking along and a selfie stick suddenly appears.”

And he added wryly: “I sometimes think whoever invented this technology should be dealt with.”

Up up and away, again

At the time for the first moon landing I read all there was and cut it out from all magazines and newspapers. I still got it all in my files. Now some of those famous photographs, and some not known,  are up for auction. That was also a historical moment for Hasselblad, the Swedish camera manufacturer. A small step for man, but a giant step for mankind…

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2017/jan/31/spacewalks-and-moon-landings-nasa-auctions-archive-photos

😊  Pelle

Whatever you think

This is a very interesting article about people who thought they could photograph thoughts. Whatever you think, and I, the images with the old hand writing are beautiful.  It is artistic. Perhaps even art…?

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170116-the-man-who-tried-to-photograph-thoughts-and-dreams

Images courtesy of The Institute for Frontier Areas of Psychology and Mental Health (IGPP) in Germany. Article by Josh Gabbatiss in BBC.

😊   Pelle

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