Tag Archives: The world

Magnum photographers’ historic shots of New York – in pictures

Magnum has always been, and is always great photography by great photographers.     Oh, there are SO MANY exhibitions I would like to see…

I found this in The Guardian.

😊  Pelle

As part of its 70th anniversary program, Magnum Photos is holding an exhibition of photographs taken in New York City during the early years of the agency, from 1947 to 1960. The show includes classic images from their archive, as well as pictures from their New York office. Early Magnum In & On New York is at the National Arts Club Grand Gallery until 29 April, can be viewed online and prints purchased through Magnum.

Image at the top:
Photographers Elliott Erwitt and Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1959
Photograph: Marc Riboud/Magnum Photos

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/mar/31/magnum-photos-new-york-city-historic-pictures?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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New York, 1955
Photograph: Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos

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Sammy Davis Jr looks out a Manhattan window, 1959
Photograph: Burt Glinn/Magnum

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James Dean in Times Square, 1955
Photograph: Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

Still Going Strong

Great to see these images from a young Bod Dylan! I was happy to attend his first concert here in Stockholm last Saturday after that he received The Nobel price. A great concert by a great artist. He has changd his hat. 😊  Pelle

As Bob Dylan accepts his Nobel prize for literature this weekend, an exhibition of photographs of him on the cusp of international fame is planned to open in New York. The photographer Ted Russell first met Dylan in 1961 and his intimate pictures of Dylan performing, and at home, are the subject of a show at the Steven Kasher Gallery featuring dozens of images never before seen in the city. Bob Dylan NYC 1961–1964 opens on 20 April and will run until 3 June.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2017/apr/01/portraits-of-a-young-bob-dylan-in-pictures

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A Photograph Never Stands Alone

Interesting read from NY Times written by Teju Cole. Teju Cole is the magazine’s photography critic and the author, most recently, of the essay collection “Known and Strange Things.” Read more in the full article!

Images make us think of other images. Photographs remind us of other photographs, and perhaps only the earliest photographs had a chance to evade this fate. But soon after the invention of photography, the world was full of photographs, and newly made photographs could not avoid semantic contamination. Each photograph came to seem like a quotation from the great archive of photographs. Even the earliest photographs are themselves now burdened by this reality, because when we look at them, we do so in the knowledge of everything that came after. All images, regardless of the date of their creation, exist simultaneously and are pressed into service to help us make sense of other images. This suggests a possible approach to photography criticism: a river of interconnected images wordlessly but fluently commenting on one another.

A photograph can’t help taming what it shows. We are accustomed to speaking about photographs as though they were identical to their subject matter. But photographs are also pictures — organized forms on a two-dimensional surface — and they are part of the history of pictures. A picture of something terrible will always be caught between two worlds: the world of “something terrible,” which might shock us or move us to a moral response, and the world of “a picture,” which generates an aesthetic response. The dazzle of art and the bitterness of life are yoked to each other. There is no escape.

 

In pictures: Sacred geometries

A small group of photographers have turned their lenses on the urban landscape, seeking to capture the beauty of the architecture around us.

The images explore the idea of sacred geometries, the perfect mix of proportion and mathematical ratios that are pleasing to the eye and a reflection of those found in nature.

The pictures can be seen at the Anise Gallery in London until 15 April 2017.

I saw this in BBC, In Pictures.

😊  Pelle

_95051523_fernandoguerra_maatmuseum_portugal_medium
© Fernando Guerra
_95051525_huftonandcrow_sc_oculus_medium
© Hufton and Crow Photography
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© Doublespace

 

Was Diane Arbus the Most Radical Photographer of the 20th Century?

If you have ever seen a Diane Arbus photograph you will remember it, and her very personal style. That can only be said about few photographers.                                               Thank you Leif Skoogfors for sharing this interesting article.

© Diane Arbus

A new biography and Met exhibit show how she sacrificed her marriage, her friendships, and eventually her life for her career as an artist living on the edge.

By

Diane Arbus’s last known negative is labeled “#7459.” She found herself unable to imagine past that number.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/07/diane-arbus-c-v-r.html

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Finding patterns in Australian farmland

I´d like to go to Australia! Ladies and gentlemen I give you Josh Smith. 😊  Pelle

“The end game for me is producing these series as fine art”.

© all photographs Josh Smith. Article in BBC.

Flying high above farmland, photographer Josh Smith captures colours and patterns not usually associated with rural Australia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-38888453

_94006992_14305b65-2eab-412f-be37-17c11c9ddf16His often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006993_a1405267-ed49-4374-8fce-0f513f3eb09aHis often abstract images feature subjects like machinery sculpting lines into a vast frame.

_94006997_bd80a3ef-04b3-4ae9-89dd-c6b2ec69713b It was a hobby until 2011, when his aerial shots of floods in Queensland and New South Wales were featured in a major newspaper.

_94007052_fertappSo he took to the skies, hoping to draw attention to how food and clothing is produced.

_94007055_202a3807-1a9f-4245-923b-4738de7a0996“Here in Australia, we’ve got farmers producing the highest quality produce anywhere in the world,” he said.

Please like if you like, 😉 Pelle

Turning ordinary into magical

Ever so often I feel happy after I have seen a movie from India, France, Italy or from any other country when I don´t recognize the surroundings and/or the actors. Just as great is it seeing interesting photographs from India. More street photography from where the streets looks different. I found it in The Washington Post.

😊   Pelle

Amateur photographer presents new look at life in India

More often than not, photography coming out of India tends to focus on the “exotic.” We’ve seen the pictures many times before — people performing religious rites in the Ganges River or huge gatherings like the Kumb Mela. So it is refreshing to see work that diverges from this path. Swarat Ghosh’s photographs of street scenes in India do just that. Far from the spectacles we are used to seeing, Ghosh roams the streets transforming the ordinary and banal into the magical. With his photography, he takes us on a journey through found mini-dramas or tableaus that we might ordinarily miss if we’re not watching carefully enough.

Ghosh is not a professional photographer but an avid amateur and student of the medium. In his day job, Ghosh is a lead visual designer at a software company in Hyderabad. His earliest memory of photography was when he began following the work of several street photographers (including Kaushal Parekh and Prashant Godbole) based in India around 2012. His own journey into photography actually came about accidentally at that time when his wife gave him a camera that same year.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2017/02/08/turning-ordinary-into-magical-amateur-photographer-presents-new-look-at-life-in-india/?hpid=hp_no-name_photo-story-a%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.d651cd86490b

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The last box camera in Santiago, Chile – in pictures

Everything is not digital these days. Another place, but the same time. 😊 Pelle

Luis Maldonado is the last remaining photographer in the main square of the Chilean capital still using a wooden box camera.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2017/jan/30/the-last-box-camera-in-santiago-chile-in-pictures?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Up up and away, again

At the time for the first moon landing I read all there was and cut it out from all magazines and newspapers. I still got it all in my files. Now some of those famous photographs, and some not known,  are up for auction. That was also a historical moment for Hasselblad, the Swedish camera manufacturer. A small step for man, but a giant step for mankind…

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2017/jan/31/spacewalks-and-moon-landings-nasa-auctions-archive-photos

😊  Pelle

Up up and away

Here is another set of drone photography. One perhaps considered as a selfie. Nature from above is often very graphical and beautiful. Just look at these images. Hmmm, just thinking, how many are falling from the sky?

Aerial photography platform SkyPixel received 27,000 entries to its 2016 competition. Here are the winning shots plus some of The Guardians favourites. SkyPixel’s competition was open to both professional and amateur photographers and was split into three categories: Beauty, 360, and Drones in Use.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/gallery/2017/jan/25/worlds-best-drone-photography-skypixel-competition

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